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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Col. Cedric Leighton (Ret.)
Former air force intelligence officer and deputy training director for the NSA
KQED 01/15/2014
Leighton: For the most part it is simple surveillance, but it can also be used in, as a means, as a precursor really to an attack. So for example, if the United States decides to go into what is known as computer network attack, then they could use the information that is gleaned through technologies like this to serve as the pathway in order to conduct an attack of that type. So that's what they're doing. They're looking at, they're recoinoutering the network, they’re doing a reconnaissance mission and then if they need to attack for whatever policy reason then they can do so based on the information they gain from techniques like this.
Col. Cedric Leighton (Ret.)
Former air force intelligence officer and deputy training director for the NSA
KQED 01/15/2014
Ifill: Are techniques like this only limited to potential warfare or are they limited to keeping an eye on foreign governments or is it also applicable domestically? Leighton: It is, technically it would be applicable domstically, but policy wise and from a legal standpoint it is not used domestically. These techniques are only used for foreign intelligence purposes. Now, at least by the NSA. Now when it comes to the targets itself, that is based on intelligence priorities and those intelligence priorities are decided not only by the Director of National Intelligence but also in the White House by the President.
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